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How To Record A Police Officer Safety & Legally PT 1

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2018

The department of homeland security has a saying “if you see something say something.” Our philosophy is, “if you see something, film something.”

The following information is a culmination of law enforcement feedback, concerned citizens, and legal counsel experience. The purpose of this post is to encourage concerned citizens to consider the proper methods when video recording police officers safely and legally. Before we begin, we want to talk about the two main objectives, safety and legality. Your safety, your family’s safety, and anyone you are with on location is top priority.

What are the legal boundaries for video recording a police officer? In general, the concerned citizen would not be legally obligated to hand over their camera or cell phone. However, there are ways to assist the police department and the community so unnecessary tension is not created between the law enforcement on scene and the concerned citizens.

 

Can you legally record a police officer?

 

The specific details expressed in this post are based primarily on Michigan law.

In a public place where there is no expectation of privacy, a concerned citizen is allowed to record video or take pictures. A concerned citizen cannot video record in a manner in which they are considered interfering with the event or investigation. This includes video recording or entering too close within the officer’s tactical operating area. Again, safety is priority. Interference to an investigation diverts the police officers attention or reduces his or her focus. The grey area then becomes “does the police officer consider that you are interfering with the investigation at that time” in their opinion. At this point, you might want to adjust your approach, where you’re standing, and what you’re filming.

 

Working with a police officer and not against them

 

Be aware that an officer may have a tremendous amount on his or her mind and may still be in a heightened sense of emotion or coming down from a critical incident previous to the one you are currently video recording.

Even if you didn’t record, if you were a witness, write down your name and number or give a business card to the police officer and mention you saw what happened and to contact you if they feel you can assist with the investigation. If the police officer is unavailable or too busy at the time, you can supply this information to their shift supervisor. No matter what, the will be the one that wants that information.

You have a right to remain anonymous as a concerned citizen you can request that from the police department, or you may go through a third party, such as Primeau Forensics, and ask for assistance. Certain people are obligated to present the recordings, statements, or anything heard as possible evidence of a case. Some of these people are: nurses, social workers, security, paramedics, and first responders. Whether you record an event, or are an eye witness to one, you could be subpoenaed and ordered to go to court. IF you are a witness, you may be legally obligated to give a statement, and/or appear in court.

 

In order to protect the integrity of the parties involved as well as the investigation, it is crucial to remain unbiased.

 

If it is one person recording, record the whole event. Don’t be biased recording one party or the other. Pointing the camera directly at the officer introduces bias and makes it difficult to determine who is at fault. Record the entire interaction of both parties. Don’t be offended if the police officer asks or tells you to back up or to get away. It will almost always be for your safety and to eliminate the officers consideration that you could be an additional threat.

 

Effectiveness of the recoding as video evidence.

 

We also want to address the effectiveness of your video recording and how it pertains to the investigation down the road. The primary purpose for reviewing video evidence in the court is to determine how the events occurred naturally. Second, the evidence illustrates the overall picture as accurately as possible. In too many situations, a concerned citizen will record an interaction without knowing many of the facts of the incident, or who was involved. This distorts the public perspective and may cause harm to the investigation.

 

The guidelines provided in this video are based primarily on Michigan case law. For more information, visit the Michigan legislature website.

To learn more about our expert security consultant, Theo Chalogianis, please feel free to contact Chalogianis Consulting LLC at chalogianis@gmail.com.

 

How to Video Record a Police Officer PT 2

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2018

Here at Primeau Forensics, we come across many videos that were recorded using a smart phone. Statistics show that 77% of Americans use a smartphone. Couple that with the vast amount of apps on the market that make recording and sharing videos one of the easiest parts of a person’s day, it’s no surprise that an average of 60 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute.

“What does that have to do with video forensics?” you may ask. Because the ease of recording videos has become so prevalent in our society, more and more citizens are capturing both criminal activity and law enforcement interactions with their smartphones.

These videos become an integral part of the investigation. If they are poor quality, only so much can be done to forensically enhance them. Our goal is to give you the necessary solutions to common problems that we encounter to assist you in acquiring the best recording possible.

 

Problem #1: Unstable footage
Solution: Try to stay calm and focus on keeping the camera steady. Don’t zoom in too much on the subject to where your camera is unable to properly auto focus. Be sure to keep a safe distance. Should the video need additional zooming, it can be forensically enhanced.

Problem #2: Landscape vs Portrait
Solution: Always film in landscape mode. Filming in landscape offers a wider view of the situation. This provides investigators with valuable information, like point of entry, outside factors, and other surroundings. Filming in landscape mode also provides a clearer image for forensic experts.

 

Problem #3: The citizen who is filming does not “blend in” and in turn escalates the situation.

Solution: If you feel like you are too close to the situation, you probably are. Safety of you and everyone else is most important. So, when in doubt, back up. Also, don’t feel the need to use any equipment more than your smartphone. As technology advances, smartphone cameras are advancing with it. Most smartphones use a 1080p resolution, which is sufficient for forensic enhancement.

 

Problem #4: The video is edited or uploaded to social media before it is handed off to the proper authorities.
Solution: Don’t alter the video in anyway. Whether it is: shortening the video, using apps or software to enhance the video or the audio, or adding effects. All of these adjustments effect the Chain of Custody (he order in which a piece of criminal evidence should be handled by persons investigating a case, specif. the unbroken trail of accountability that ensures the physical security of samples, data, and records in a criminal investigation.) as well as the forensic experts ability to identify and/or authenticate the video. We have all seen viral videos on social media or news outlets of criminal activity or law enforcement interactions. While these are important to start what could be difficult conversations in our society, it is imperative that the investigation be complete before a video is made public. Posting the video online could give suspects important details that could hinder the investigation and put lives at risk. It is important to remember that what you film could affect people’s lives. Think how you would want someone to handle the footage if it was you or a loved one in the video.

 

Problem #5: The video is not unbiased and only focuses on one subject and not the entire situation.
Solution: While you may be emotionally invested in the situation, it is crucial that the video evidence be unbiased. In order for the investigation to be as accurate as possible, investigators need to see the event in its entirety. It is a good idea to begin filming as soon as you see a problem arising and continue filming until the interaction is finalized. Another good idea is to use multiple cameras when available. This provides multiple viewpoints as well as the ability to have multiple versions of the recording to have the best possible outcome.

 

If you are filming an interaction with law enforcement, be mindful and respectful of the officer’s tactical operating area. If you have concerns regarding an officer’s actions, take the appropriate measures to speak directly with their supervisor. If the officer asks you to back up, he/she is doing so for your safety. It is always best to work with the officer and not against them, and to keep in mind that the officer may be in a heightened state of emotion from a previous incident. As Barrack Obama, once said, “Understand, our police officers put their lives on the line for us every single day. They’ve got a tough job to do to maintain public safety and hold accountable those who break the law.”

 

 

 

 

The guidelines provided in this video are based primarily on Michigan case law. For more information, visit the Michigan legislature website.

To learn more about our expert security consultant, Theo Chalogianis, please feel free to contact Chalogianis Consulting LLC at chalogianis@gmail.com.

Smart Phone Video Enhancement

Friday, March 4th, 2016

Many people own smart phones and use them for various day to day activities. Included with these tasks is the recording of video, which can be used to record an event like an accident or a crime.

We process many cases each year that include video recordings that were created on a smart phone. In the following paragraphs, we hope to communicate some information that will guide you on how to handle recording an accident or illegal event. We have included some before and after forensic enhancement for your review. We also will include some advise on what to do to best capture the event in case you require forensic enhancement.

Since most smart phone video evidence is recorded freehand or without a tripod, you can’t guarantee that the video evidence usable. When people are nervous they may shake while recording. In some cases, your phone may be zoomed in which can create less than quality video evidence. Our goal is to help you understand the best way to record smart phone video and process it with a video forensic expert for the best results.

Record on your smart phone horizontally or landscape

When recording video on your smart phone, hold the phone horizontally when recording and do not zoom in. One of the most prevalent problems we have seen with video recordings are they are not stable. The chaotic motion of a cell phone video can make it hard to make out exactly what’s happening.

The two clips below will help you understand how video recordings are processed forensically. The first clip is of an iPhone video as it was recorded. No stabilization or other forensic enhancement has been applied to this video.

In the next enhanced sample we apply warp stabilization. Notice how the frame follows the motion of the video, creating a more stable picture for analysis.

As you can see, the subject in the video was not close enough to the smart phone that was recording the video, making it difficult to make out the events as they occurred. Clip One is not very helpful in this condition for use in court. The subjects are very far away, making it difficult to see the events as they occurred and were recorded.

The forensic enhancement process is not as simple as zooming in on the video recording. This will lower your overall video quality. Fixing it or enhancing your video isn’t nearly as simple as pushing the “enhance” button on your computer.

The reason that the quality of video is reduced when you zoom in has to do with something referred to as “pixels.”

Simply put, pixels are the small boxes of color code that combine to make up a given image. Each image is composed of a series of pixels that display the image you see in front of you.

Expanding an image means also expanding the size of each pixel. Because each pixel is representative of one “frame” of a bigger picture, such as photos making up a collage, each individual square pixel will expand along with the image. The increase of pixel size can cause distortion to the image, therefore making it even harder to decipher the contents of an image.

This is where a video forensic expert is necessary. We have training in video enhancement and experience using the hardware and software tools capable of clarifying and enhancing the events that occurred when you recorded your video.

As you saw in the second video sample above, the image has been expanded so that we can see the events that occurred up close. The quality of the video hasn’t been compromised. This is because of training and experience.

At the risk of being redundant, the biggest problem we see with smart phone video evidence is the orientation of the cell phone while recording. When we receive smart phone video evidence, many of the video recordings are vertically oriented. If your footage becomes evidence; not having a horizontal (or landscape) recorded video to work with really constricts your range of sight of a given event.

Utilizing the footage above as another example, notice that around the :25 second mark, the camera focuses on the Jeep pulling up, as another officer runs towards the scene. This takes our focus away from the scene, and we miss a substantial amount of the incident.

Had this evidence been shot horizontally, we may have been able to see what happened when that officer arrived to the scene, along with seeing the white Jeep parking in the background.

With the expansion of smart phone video technology, your smart phone can be of assistance recording crime and criminal activity. It is important to understand smart phone video enhancement from the forensic expert’s perspective. The highest quality video recording will reveal more in court. However, despite the quality, it is crucial to employ a video forensic expert to make the most out of your smart phone video.

Forensic Video Enhancement

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

forensic Video enhancementOne of the activities we perform daily at Primeau Forensics is Forensic Video Enhancement. Video enhancement is one of our most requested forensic services.

Forensic video enhancement can help litigators understand events that have been recorded on video but are difficult to see because of movement or shaky cameras, the subjects distance from the camera or video is too dark. During the Boston bombings for example, CCTV cameras outside retail stores helped the FBI capture the terrorists who were responsible.

Some of the reasons video needs forensic enhancement is because too often cameras are not properly maintained. This is a huge problem that is not noticed until after the crime has been committed. Or, worse yet, the cameras are not installed or positioned properly.

In the following blog post I will provide you with a few particular tips when performing forensic video enhancement.

• Original Video- Always begin with the original video recording. Maintain a chain of custody for your video recording. If you have to export an AVI file to provide to police, keep a backup on thumb drive for insurance. If you have is a copy on DVD and not the original, then load the DVD copy of the video directly into your computer for forensic video enhancement.

• Computer Software- Use professional forensic software program to enhance like Adobe Premiere Pro and Clear ID. Primeau Forensics uses these as well as Adobe Photo Shop to enhance images exported from the video for forensic video enhancement. Remember, you can also export frames as still images to identify activity and other video components.

• Color Correction- Perform a color correction process first before performing any other forensic enhancement process. This is especially important if your video recording is dark and or was recorded at night. Be careful not to add too much brightness.

• Enlargement- If you need to enlarge a portion of the recorded video viewing area, apply after you review the footage on a large video monitor. At Primeau Forensics we use minimum 27” professional video monitors. Remember, the larger the playback monitor, the better you can see events in the video and the less you need to enlarge your video as an enhancement step. This is even more important in the courtroom.

• Equipment- If the recording system that made the recording you wish to enhance, before contacting a video forensic expert, learn the type of equipment that made the video you are enhancing. Often times a poor CCTV video export may be to blame for the poor video quality.

Forensic video enhancement  is an art as well as a science. It is important to understand that you should use different filtering to get different results. Always begin with the largest file size and structure as close to original digital video recording as possible.

Before buying forensic video enhancement software, download a trial version and determine if you are comfortable using the software or would rather contact a video forensic expert to perform your forensic video enhancement.

Audio in Video Evidence

Wednesday, April 29th, 2015

Audio EvidenceWhen performing an audio and video authentication and analysis,a trained audio video forensic expert will utilize several methods in an attempt to detect an edit in a video recording that is used as evidence. Some of the time a critical ear can be just as important to a video forensic expert as the scientific community accepted software tools and an established chain of custody.

Though it is said that “A picture is worth a thousand words,” an audio file can be worth even more in a video forensic laboratory. A trained video forensic expert knows what to look for (or listen to) during a forensic video authentication and analysis investigation.

Many CCTV systems now have the capability to record audio, and this audio portion of the surveillance video recording can be crucial to the legitimacy of the digital video evidence. Audio is a great tool to investigate and detect an anomaly or edit when investigating a video recording. To do so there’s a process and protocol we follow at Primeau Forensics. 

Audio is comprised of “sound pressure waves,” which are waveform representative of the change in air pressure in a recording. One characteristic of sound pressure waves is that they are always smooth and continuous.

Let’s say, for example, you’re recording in an open, quiet room. While you’re recording, a rebellious teenager comes in the room and blows off his air-horn. Even though that loud sound completely changed the overall sound in the room, the wave that represents the pressure change will always be smooth and continuous.

The only time that a wave is not smooth and continuous is when an edit is made. Keeping this in mind will give you more of an idea of what you’re listening for.

When an edit is made to a recording, this disturbs the waveform. This makes it temporarily rigid and inconsistent. All sound pressure waves should be the opposite of that. So, when I am critically listening and hear a sound that is outside of that smooth, uninterrupted audio file, I know I have an anomaly that may be an edit.

How is that disturbance represented? Well, it will usually manifest itself in the form of a ‘pop’. In the context of video, it usually will only last a frame, but the sound will be there. If you hear anything that deviates from the already established waveform, you know that the evidence may have been edited.

Adobe and Izatope RX has software that allows a forensic experts to more accurately detect these edits. For example, a “spectrogram,” detects the “noise floor” in a recording. The spectrum recorded for a noise floor should be consistent in visual characteristics as long as nothing changes with the ambiance in a recording. When you see a deviation in that consistency, just as if you hear one in the dialogue, you can tell that the audio, and sub-sequentially the video, may have been altered.

There are many ways to detect edits visually when reviewing digital video evidence. Beginning with an established chain of custody and performing forensic video authentication and analysis will reveal integrity in your video recording or anomalies that reveal scientifically that the CCTV video recording may have been compromised and is unreliable.

Increase in Body Worn Cameras

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015

vievuIn the last few years, Primeau Forensics has seen an increase in cases that involve surveillance video including body camera video recordings. This digital video evidence is very important in order of investigators and the Trier of Fact to understand the events as they occurred.

Much of this activity began back in 2013 and helped locate and identify the Boston Marathon Bombers. FBI investigators had to cull through dozens if not hundreds of hours of CCTV video surveillance recordings in order to find and identify the terrorists that were eventually responsible for these acts of violence.

Lately, video as evidence is expanding to include body worn cameras that have been implemented into many police agencies across the United States. President Obama authorized funding for police agencies to purchase this equipment. Currently, there are numerous police agencies around the country that are testing different makes of body cameras and learning how to properly integrate them into their procedures. Many of these agencies have been transparent with their testing and have begun to approve further funding to outfit more officers with cameras.

The Grand Rapids, Michigan Police Department was recently testing two different kinds of body-worn cameras among eight different police officers, who presented their feedback on the camera systems online. The city has now approved the funding for two hundred officers to be outfitted with cameras. The Seattle, Washington Police Department has also been very open about their body camera testing, even releasing some of the footage online for the public to see. To maintain privacy, they blurred the video and removed the audio so no individuals could be identified. A large amount of the public has been pushing for police worn body cameras ever since the Michael Brown shooting in Ferguson, Missouri last August.

The benefit of body worn cameras is that they protect everyone, police officers as well as citizens. Many police agencies are in full support of the cameras because they reduce the questioning of what happened during an altercation. If a disagreement is established against an officer, internal affairs will be able to check the body camera video and see the events as they occurred. Police agencies believe this will be very helpful with training officers and improving the relationship between the public and police.

The biggest issue arising from the increase of body worn cameras is the huge amount of data being created. Not only does this require a very large amount of storage space, but it must be stored securely so that the video evidence cannot be tampered with. Thankfully, many of the companies providing these body worn cameras also include proprietary software that ensures the evidence cannot be modified between the camera and the system. Access to the video will be limited to authorized personnel only to maintain the authenticity and safety of the video evidence.

As a Video Forensic Expert, I see many benefits to this increase in body worn cameras. I have worked on numerous cases in which evidence from a body worn camera greatly helped the investigation and proceeding trial. Police dash cameras have often been used as video evidence for investigations but they often do not show the entire altercation because of their stationary view. Police body worn cameras add a second perspective to be used along with the dash cam which can be invaluable to an investigation. Having the two angles of the event in question allows anyone involved in the case to get a better picture of what happened.

Of course all video recordings submitted as evidence in a civil or criminal litigation must have an established chain of custody that supports the events and provides integrity for the digital video evidence. We encourage you to review our series on How to Properly Record a Police Officer when adding Good Samaritan video recordings to an investigation.

 

Video Evidence – South Carolina Officer Shooting Unarmed Black Man

Wednesday, April 8th, 2015

South Carolina Officer Shooting Unarmed Black ManA South Carolina police officer was arrested yesterday for the murder of an unarmed black man. This is all because of a video that surfaced of the North Charleston officer, Michael Slager, firing eight times at the unarmed man as the man fled in an open field.

According to police reports, the victim in question, 50-year-old Walter L. Scott, continued to flee after being hit by the officer’s stun gun. Police report that Mr. Scott had taken Officer Slager’s stun gun, which lead to a reasonable pursuit.

However, the video seems to show a different story. The stun gun is dropped, and after Mr. Scott is gunned down and the officer is seen dropping something next to the unarmed man. It is not clear as to what was dropped; however, some fear that this was planted on the man after his shooting, as police report that the officer’s taser was taken.

Whatever the case, the innocent bystander who recorded Good Samaritan video aided in this investigation. Not only did he take the responsibility to record the events, but he also utilized landscape mode on his cell phone to record the altercation. This provided additional digital video evidence for this investigation.

As you see in the first few seconds of the video, his shot in “portrait” orientation would not have accurately captured the events as they occurred. Mr. Scott would have run off screen, and we never would have seen this happen. However, because he shot the video in landscape mode, we’re able to see the shooting clearly.

Situations like this help reinforce the importance of the little devices in our pockets. Smartphone video can make or break a case like this, and we need to understand why it’s so crucial to utilize the tools we have when an unlawful event occurs. If it weren’t for this Good Samaritan, this story may have gone unseen and unnoticed. It really shows how important video can be.

You can watch the video below via the NY Times:

 

Tips for Mobile Video/Cell Phone Enhancement

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015

cell phone enhancementIn past blog posts, we have discussed techniques that we use as video forensic experts that get the best results when conducting CCTV video enhancement. What we have yet to discuss is how we get the best results when enhancing mobile video recordings.

Since most mobile video evidence is shot freehand on a smart-phone camera, you can’t guarantee that the video evidence will be of legitimate quality. People are often nervous when video recording something like a fight, accident or other public situation and naturally shake while recording. Smart- phone video quality is often good at best. The placement of your subject and method of recording video can lead to poor video evidence that needs forensic enhancement.

As a video forensic expert, we know firsthand about all of the tools available in software programs and out board digital signal processors that can help your video provide valuable information to the authorities.

At Primeau Forensics, we have a team of video experts that have reviewed and enhanced hundreds of videos, some of which are from smart-phone cameras. One of the most prevalent problems that we have noticed through experience is unstable smart-phone video recordings. The chaotic motion of a cell phone video can make it hard to tell what’s happening.

One of the tools we use is made by Adobe; Adobe products have excellent tools for video enhancement assignments. One tool can be found in Adobe After Effects. It’s a plug-in entitled the “warp stabilizer.” This plugin creates a full frame reference for the shakiness of a smart phone video. It enhances the viewer’s ability to view the video better and determine the events that occurred more effectively.

For example, we have posted two clips below. The first clip is from an actual video enhancement case. It was recorded using an iPhone. No stabilization has been applied to this video. Look at how difficult it is to see the events as they occurred.

IMG 1363 from Primeau Forensics on Vimeo.

In the next video, we take the same source clip, but this time apply several filters including warp stabilization. Notice how it is easier to view the video as the frame follows the motion of the video, creating a more stable picture for analysis.

IMG 1363.MOV CLARIFIED VIDEO from Primeau Forensics on Vimeo.

In many cases, such as the video above, the subject at hand will not be close enough to the smart-phone capturing the video, making it nearly impossible to make out the events as they occurred. In the first video example above, the subjects are very far away, making it difficult to make out what is happening.

A trained video forensic expert knows how to apply tools that will enhance the video evidence. These tools allow you to zoom in on a video and clarify difficult-to-see events. This process may lower your overall video quality, and as Hollywood may lead you to believe, fixing it isn’t nearly as simple as pushing the “enhance” button.

The reason that the quality of this video is reduced when zoomed in has to do with the video “pixels.”Simply put, pixels are the small boxes of color code that combine to make up a given image. Each image is composed of a specific amount of pixels that make up the clear image you see in front of you.

To further explain, think of a collage. Have you ever seen a collage composed of much smaller pictures? Once the pictures are combined in a specific order (usually by color), it creates a much bigger image. Think of pixels as those smaller square pictures that make up the entire picture.

Expanding an image also means increasing the size of each pixel. Because each pixel is a representative of one “frame” of a bigger picture, such as the photos making up a collage, each individual square pixel will expand along with the image. The increase of pixel size can cause distortion to the image, therefore making it even harder to decipher the contents of an image.

Luckily, Photoshop and other Adobe programs provide solutions called “pixel interpolation.”

Generally, pixel interpolation provides two options for this video enhancement situation. You can utilize a plugin known as the “bi-cubic smoother,” which blends each cubic pixel together to create a more cohesive image.

The other plugin is known as the “pyramid shaper.” This allows for a similar process, however, this follows what’s known as pyramid coordinates, an alternate method of morphing the pixels.

Which one of these methods is best comes down to the circumstances surrounding your investigation.

As you see in the second video, the image has been enhanced so the viewer can better see the events that occurred. It is important to note that the quality of the video hasn’t been compromised. This is because steps were taken like applying the bi-cubic smoother allowing the pixels to cooperate making a image more clear.

The biggest problem we see at Primeau Forensics with mobile video evidence is the orientation of the cell phone while recording.

If you should find yourself recording a video using a smart-phone, first and most importantly be sure to turn the phone on it’s side or ‘landscape’. We receive a lot of video evidence where the phone was held vertically instead of horizontally. This is fine when your intent is to view the footage directly on the phone, but when that footage becomes evidence; not having a full frame horizontal recorded video eliminates a large portion of the scene being video recorded. The vertical position records a much more narrow view of the scene and instead records larger height dimensions. This keeps potentially valuable information off the videos and out of the court room. It dramatically constricts the viewer’s range of sight of a given event.

Regarding the footage shown above; notice that around the 0:25 second mark, the camera focuses on the Jeep pulling up as another officer runs toward the scene. This distracts our focus away from the scene, and we miss a substantial amount of the incident.

Had this evidence been shot horizontally, we would have been able to view more of the events including the activity that happened as the officer arrived at the scene. We would also have been able to better see the white Jeep in the background which was an important detail.

Using another smart-phone video as another example, the footage below is a recording from a smart-phone of the events that transpired after this year’s tragic Charlie Hebdo shooting in Paris. The two gunmen are seen driving away from the scene of the crime before encountering a police car. The suspects shoot at the police car, causing the police to retreat, and speed off again.

If you notice, you’ll see two black bars along the outside of the vertical video. This video was also recorded holding the smart phone in a vertical position. Had this video been recorded holding the phone horizontally we would have more information recorded that may have revealed additional useful information. This scene happened just before the gunmen got away and killed additional people.

With the expansion of mobile video technology, any cell phone could effectively record a crime scene that can go on to become crucial evidence. The highest quality video recording can help litigators more effectively.

Body Worn Cameras; More Safe than Dash Cam for Police

Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

body worn camera policeAfter the controversial grand jury announcement in the case of Michael Brown, President Obama has proposed the idea of issuing police departments across the nation with body-worn cameras for law enforcement. Between Michael Brown, and the controversy behind the Eric Garner case, citizens are asking: Will body-worn cameras help police as well as the public? In this video forensic expert’s opinion, the answer to that question is a resounding YES!

Video is the least challenged of all digital media forensic evidence. It provides a clear indication of the events as they occurred by allowing the judge and jury to observe the event with their own eyes. Nothing is as revealing as video to clearly show the court exactly what happened.

Had Darren Wilson, the officer involved in the Michael Brown shooting, worn a body-worn camera, the case might have had a different outcome. The ability for the jury to see something first person can be invaluable to their decision.

Here’s an example: In the video embedded below, courtesy of ABC News, we see two pieces of evidence: footage of a confrontation taken from the dash-cam, along with evidence taken from the body worn camera. As the first half of the video shows, the police officer in question tackles the suspect for seemingly no reason. The body-cam, however, tells a completely different story.


More ABC US news | ABC World News

What the white Kia in the driveway blocks is the event that takes place at 1:53 of the video, whereas the suspect openly tries to assault the police officer in question. In this instance, had a body worn camera not been issued, the jury may have interpreted this in a completely different way.

Last year, Primeau Forensics had the opportunity to test and review one of these body worn cameras, the VieVu LE2. These cameras would be phenomenal for police forces all over the U.S. It’s 72-degree wide angle lens allows for a wider first person perspective, so that even a suspect standing at a distance from the officer is still being recorded. The near-professional quality of the audio and video ensure a clear understanding of the situation, and the digital signature security ensures that the video footage cannot be tampered with while on the device.

Body-worn cameras could completely revolutionize the court system and how it interprets evidence. Video like this can be instrumental to the outcome of a case, as it provides the most realistic representation of what exactly transpired in a given confrontation. As shown above, not even a dash-cam can always show us everything, but having a first person perspective of a given confrontation is pivotal to the jury’s final decision.

For more info on body-worn cameras, check out CEO Ed Primeau’s interview with VIEVU CEO Steve Ward here!

Police Misconduct and Mobile Video – DeShawn Currie

Friday, October 10th, 2014

police misconductLast night, ABC News ran a story about a young foster child who was pepper-sprayed in his own home. The boy, DeShawn Currie, was mistaken for a burglar reported by neighbors, and was pepper-sprayed at the front door of his home in North Carolina.

Stories like this really emphasize how powerful the consumer video revolution really is. Police misconduct of this kind may have gone completely unnoticed without the advancement of video that has taken place over the past decade. Video is the most powerful evidence in situations like these, and we need to remain aware of the power that video as evidence has in the world today. Without the advancement of the smartphone camera, dash-cams, body worn cameras such as the GoPro, along with advancements in CCTV technology, this absurd behavior from police may have gone completely undocumented. Now that we have all of this technology at our fingertips, we have a much higher chance of exposing misconduct of this degree.

To read more about the consumer video revolution and it’s effects on the courtroom, click here.

Watch the full story from ABC News below.


More ABC news videos | ABC Entertainment News

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